Archive Page 2

09
Feb
13

Why Can Some Kids Handle Pressure While Others Fall Apart?

See on Scoop.itWriting and Literature

Scientists think bouts of panic in stressful situations can be traced to genetics. But don’t freak out. Biology is not necessarily destiny.

Angela Drummond-Mathews‘s insight:

This is particularly interesting. Our students show us often that they handle stress differently. Appreciating these differences might lead to new curriculum management strategies to optimize classes for both "worriers" and "warriors."

See on www.nytimes.com

09
Feb
13

Grand Canyon U. hires adjuncts as full-time online faculty | Inside Higher Ed

See on Scoop.itWriting and Literature

See on www.insidehighered.com

09
Feb
13

On Pins and Needles: Stylist Turns Ancient Hairdo Debate on Its Head

See on Scoop.itWriting and Literature

Angela Drummond-Mathews‘s insight:

A hairdresser turns scholar when it comes to ancient hairdos!

See on online.wsj.com

07
Feb
13

CUNY adjuncts ask not to be called professors in course syllabuses to highlight working conditions | Inside Higher Ed

See on Scoop.itWriting and Literature

See on www.insidehighered.com

06
Feb
13

Our Beliefs Shape Our Teaching

ImageThere are many reasons why conflict can exist within a school or a team of educators. In December, I attended a fantastic workshop at the annual Learning Forward conference on breaking through conflict. It was led by Robert Garmston (co-author of Unlocking Group Potential to Improve Schools) and Jennifer Abrams (author of Having Hard Conversations). In this workshop, the presenters offered one way of identifying where conflict originates — in the belief systems that we each hold about the role and purpose of education. What’s most problematic, said Garmston and Abrams, is when we are working from different belief systems but haven’t articulated them as such, and therefore don’t understand why others do what they do. These undercurrents of conflict can exist amongst a staff, between an administration and a teaching staff, and between many groups within our world of schools.

 

From:

Teacher Collaboration: When Belief Systems Collide

22
Jan
13

I have had the same complaint for years. Demographers tell us that the new generation of students will think in a completely different way and come prepared with a host of new technological skill-sets. So far, this has not come to pass. Where are my digital natives?

Used Books in Class

To all those who claim that all students today are digital “natives,” I beg to disagree.

Digital natives are defined as those people who have grown-up using technology daily beginning in the 1960s, but the term is more commonly used to describe those born in the 21st Century. According to the PBS Frontline Website, 

  • Digital Natives aged 12 to 24 spend 4.5 hours a day viewing screen media (TV, Internet, Internet video, mobile video), excluding games;
  • 82 percent of seventh- to twelfth-graders “media multitask” while doing homework, e.g. IM, TV, Web surfing, etc.

The NYTimes 2010 article, “If Your Kids Are Awake, They’re Probably Online” discusses the use of digital devices stating, “Those ages 8 to 18 spend more than seven and a half hours a day with such devices.” Certainly, use by our students has increased since then.

Despite  these statistics, I am convinced that many students are not digital “natives…

View original post 1,007 more words

10
Jan
13

Making the Most of Your Powerpoints Online

Every time I use a PowerPoint presentation in class, students ask, “Are you going to post this online?” Usually, the online version misses much of the input and energy of the lecture. Here are some tips from Faculty Focus for making online PowerPoint presentations engaging and useful to students.

If you use PowerPoint lectures in your face-to-face classes, you can use those same lectures as jumping-off points for creating narrated animations for your online students to watch.

–Adapting PowerPoint Lectures for Online Delivery: Best Practices 

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